Finding Water On Martian Meteorites, Life On Mars 13 Million Years Ago

Mars meteorites found in Glacier – Antarctica by the Japanese Antarctic Research Expedition in 2000, clarified as nakhlite, a subgroup of Martian meteorites. Mars meteorites material is distinguished from other meteorites and the Earth and Moon material, to composition of the oxygen atoms in the silicate minerals, and the gas atmosphere of Mars. The team of scientists then discover two special features associated with clay on Mars.

According to Gibson, features 000 593 Yamato meteorites is evidence of change in the presence of water and carbon associated to clay phase indicates that the planet Mars has life in the past.

When scientists analyzed, they found the tunnel micro-hole structure like the way the yarn around the Y000593 meteorite material. Micro tunnel looks curved, wavy shape consistent to change in texture, then the observed biological life in the ballistic glass which was previously considered as the interaction of bacteria to ballistic material on Earth.
Features of nanometer-sized holes Martian meteorites were also found, similar features are also seen in the Nakhla meteorite that fell in 1911 in Egypt. Measurement explained that Mars meteorite composition is significantly rich in carbon, compared to the nearby layers. Y000593 and Nakhla meteorite features are very similar, they do not override the possibility of carbon-rich material and is evidence of the existence of abiotic mechanisms on Mars.

Reference

NASA Scientists Find Evidence of Water in Meteorite, Reviving Debate Over Life on Mars, 27 february 2014, by NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Journal ref: Putative Indigenous Carbon-Bearing Alteration Features in Martian Meteorite Yamato 000593. Astrobiology, 2014.
This entry was posted in Space and tagged . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s